Gluten-Free Oats

Oats Revisited: Quaker Gluten-Free Oats

Due in large part to data published in the
public domain by Quaker, the celiac disease community continues to learn about
the nature of gluten grain cross contact in oats, including that:

Grains of wheat, barley, and rye are unevenly distributed within a given amount of oats. Despite what may be the best efforts of suppliers, gluten-containing grains have been found in both final product purity protocol oats and final product mechanically and optically sorted oats.See https://www.somatopublications.com/oat-consumption-by-celiac-disease-patients-outcomes-range-from-harmful-to-beneficial-depending-on-the-purity-of-the-oats.pdf

Based on Gluten Free Watchdog’s social […]

Gluten Free Watchdog Statement on Purity Protocol Oat Suppliers

UPDATED OCTOBER 24, 2019. There is no standardized definition for purity protocol oats*. As a result, not all oats promoted by suppliers as purity protocol are the same. At this time, Gluten Free Watchdog includes five companies in our listing of suppliers providing purity protocol oats to manufacturers, namely Avena Foods, GF Harvest, Montana Gluten-Free Processors, MGM Seed & Grain, and Glanbia Nutritionals. You can read about their protocols at https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/oats-produced-under-a-gluten-free-purity-protocol-listing-of-suppliers-and-manufacturers/

*GFCO along with representatives from Avena Foods, GF Harvest, […]

This Gluten-Free Label Wins the Prize for Most Confusing EVER

Many labeled gluten-free foods contain oats supplied by
providers of mechanically and optically sorted oats. Two consumers have reached
out to GFWD regarding the labeling on Quest oatmeal chocolate chip bars. The
label includes the following:

Certified Gluten-Free mark from GFCO

Contains … wheat**

**Trace amounts are unavoidable in field grains

Oats used in this product are certified gluten-free

There are a few issues with this labeling statement that are concerning:

1. “Contains … wheat.” Contains statements are regulated under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer […]

Why mechanically and optically sorted “gluten-free” oats continue to keep me up at night

If you are new to the gluten-free diet and are unfamiliar with the cross contact issues associated with oats and the differences between purity protocol and mechanically/optically sorted oats, please see the following articles before reading this post https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/oats-and-the-gluten-free-diet-qa-part-1/ and https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/oats-and-the-gluten-free-diet-qa-part-2/

Many labeled gluten-free foods contain oats supplied by providers of mechanically and optically sorted oats. Recently a consumer reached out to me regarding the labeling on a gluten-free snack bar containing oats. The label read, “”Contains … wheat** **Trace […]

Updated Testing Protocol from General Mills for Labeled Gluten-Free Cheerios

General Mills uses standard oats that have been mechanically and optically sorted to remove wheat, barley, and rye in their labeled gluten-free Cheerios.

Finished product testing

(As reported to Gluten Free Watchdog and confirmed October 12, 2018)

General Mills is producing gluten-free Cheerios using what they term “validated gluten-free flour.”

General Mills determines gluten-free status of a “lot” of oat flour via a lot mean.

Further, General Mills determines gluten-free status of a “lot” of gluten-free Cheerios via a lot mean.
In both […]

Oats and the Gluten-Free Diet: Q&A Part 2

Two weeks ago I posted on social media asking you to send me your questions on oats—anything that was on your mind. I did this because the situation with oats and the gluten-free diet is one of the most complicated issues I write about–something I’ve been doing for about 21 years.

Because you sent in so many questions, they are being answered in groups. This is the second Q&A post on oats. Some of your questions may have been slightly […]

Oats and the Gluten-Free Diet: Q&A Part 1

Last week I posted on social media asking you to send me your questions on oats—anything that was on your mind because as I stated, “The situation with oats and the gluten-free diet is one of the most complicated issues I write about–something I’ve been doing for about 15 years.”

I’ve actually been writing about oats for so long that I forgot just how long. My first article on oats was published in the scientific literature in 1997—21 years ago […]

It isn’t just oats that have gluten cross contact issues

We’ve known for well over a decade that standard oats are highly likely to arrive at a mill from the farm containing errant wheat, barley, and rye grain. But we also have a problem with errant gluten-containing grain showing up in other naturally gluten-free grains, seeds, and legumes, including millet grain and dried lentils.

This is happening in products labeled “gluten-free” as well as those labeled “certified gluten-free.” And it doesn’t matter if the food manufacturing plant is dedicated gluten-free. […]

Gluten-Free Quaker Oats & Testing with the Nima Sensor, R5 ELISA, & G12 ELISA

November 6, 2017

Please read this entire document very carefully. The information is presented in bullet point format to hopefully make complicated information a bit easier to understand.

Background:

A consumer tested a carton of Quaker Oats labeled gluten-free with the Nima Sensor consumer-testing device. Two samples—one cooked and one raw were tested. Both results were “gluten found”.
The consumer sent all remaining product in the original container to Gluten Free Watchdog.
Gluten Free Watchdog sent the product to an […]

General Mills removing gluten-free claim from Cheerios in Canada: Implications for US market?

As many of you have heard General Mills is removing the gluten-free claim from Cheerios sold in Canada. Gluten Free Watchdog reached out to General Mills to learn more about this decision and how it might impact Cheerios sold in the US. In particular, we asked about testing protocols and any changes to these protocols. These questions are motivated by our knowledge that an AOAC working group on gluten in oats was established because “Standards and methods are needed […]

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