Goodie Girl and Nothin’ But Foods: Product packaging erroneously lists malt extract from barley

Goodie Girl and Nothin’ But Foods: Product packaging erroneously lists malt extract from barley

In honor of Celiac Disease Awareness Month 2018,

A series of bites, barks, tail wags, face licks, and pant tugs from Gluten Free Watchdog

May 30, 2018

Gluten Free Watchdog Bite, Post # 30

Goodie Girl and Nothin’ But Foods: Product packaging erroneously lists malt extract from barley

Reportedly neither cookie actually contains barley malt extract. BUT the decision by manufacturers to leave packages on store shelves with incorrect information in the ingredient list is causing confusion and angst in the celiac disease community. 

Goodie Girl Toffee Crunch Cookies. This product was first reported to us in October of 2017. As of May 2018 it remains on store shelves. The product includes the Certified Gluten-Free mark from GFCO and the ingredients list includes “malt extract.” The manufacturer states on their website that this product does not actually contain malt extract.

Nothin’ But Foods’ Cinnamon Raisin Granola Cookie Bites. GFCO issued an alert for this product on May 17. As of May 28 it remains on store shelves. The cookie includes barley malt extract in the ingredients list and product packaging includes the Certified Gluten-Free mark from GFCO. The manufacturer states that the product does not actually contain malt extract.

In my opinion, both products should have been pulled from store shelves to avoid causing confusion among folks with celiac disease and gluten-related disorders. Reassuring this community should matter more than the manufacturer cost associated with removing products.

Consider speaking with your wallet when it comes to these brands.

Thank you to the consumers who continue to notify Gluten Free Watchdog about these products and share their photos.

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Comments (2)

  • Jeanne
    Reply

    THanks, Tricia. Good catch on those items. I’m very very careful when buying a packaged product; even if it says ‘GF’ I still read the ingredients. I wouldn’t eat anything with malt extract. Which means they would’ve lost my sale if I’d been shopping for a dessert treat. My concern is always especially with newly-diagnosed celiacs who maybe rely too much on the GF designation. Thanks on behalf of all of us for helping us call these companies to task.

    May 30, 2018 at 6:05 pm
  • Celiac Mama Reply

    I am now wondering if the Goodie Girl creme cookies were also mislabeled, but this time for oat flour. I bought 3 boxes before they were shown as “sold out”, and they do not list oat flour as an ingredient. I now see that a different size package of the same cookies lists oat flour as an ingredient. My daughter, like many celiacs, reacts to even GF oats. So we have been eating these without being notified that they were mislabeled, and my daughter was out at risk of intestinal damage. I sent them a message to clarify but have not heard back. How can this not be “public recall” worthy to let consumers know so we didn’t inadvertently continue to ingest an allergen? I am so disappointed in this company.

    October 17, 2018 at 11:16 pm

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